Sunday, August 23, 2015

Tabula Rosa Systems Blog Of 8/22/2015 - Why It's So Hard to Put Internet in the Subway

Special Bulletin - My just released book, "You're Hired. Super Charge Your Email Skills in 60 Minutes! (And Get That Job...) is now on sales at Amazon.com


 Why It's So Damn Hard to Put Internet in the Subway
  AUG 21, 2015 @ 12:30 PM popolarmechanics.com
"We have guys working down there while there are live trains going through the system and people on the platform."
And while getting the internet underground is hard enough, making Wi-Fi work on a subway platform in particular is even harder. Despite being enclosed and technically indoors, the subway is actually considered an "outdoor environment." According to Cornish, subway temperatures can fluctuate from below freezing to over 100 degrees. That's a huge difference from putting an electronic system into an office building, which may never change more than ten degrees year-round, depending on who's got control of the thermostat.  
SUBWAY TEMPERATURES CAN FLUCTUATE FROM BELOW FREEZING TO OVER 100 DEGREES


The other problem is water. And not just puddles or errant drips from street-level. "The entire stations are pressure hosed," Cornish says, not that you would necessarily think that when you go down there. But electrical components don't get special treatment in the subway station; they need to be able to handle the hose. Add to that a persistent sprinkling of brake dust—particles of metal sprayed into the air all day as trains pull into the station—and you can see why you'd need some seriously rugged equipment. 
NYC's Wi-Fi project is coming along, but other cities already have it beat. In 2007, Hong Kong and Buenos Aires became the first cities to install Wi-Fi in their subway systems. Today, Hong Kong's subway is fully connected, while Buenos Aires has only 13 of 84 stations connected, despite early plans to the contrary. Complications are unfortunate but inevitable. There are plenty of places for rollout to get hung up. Every subway station in unique in terms of depth and layout. Unfortunately that requires creating an individual design for each, and in New York, Cornish notes, that means each and every station has to be approved separately. "There's a significant amount of engineering and project management behind each station's design and approval." It's a long and arduous process that has to be completed long before the actual wiring begins.
While being disconnected underground may cut into your Facebook time, subterranean internet has its upsides as well. A 2014 Gallup poll showed that the average American with a full time job worked between 44-49 hours a week. The workday bleeds into the rest of our lives thanks in large part to round-the-clock email, texts, and other forms of communication. It's a well-covered issue.From Monday through Friday, your average 50-minute daily commute might be your only true respite. Sure, internet will certainly make it easier to stomach getting stuck at the station, but it'll hurt when you get that email from work just as you're descending the steps. So try to enjoy the freedom of zero bars while you still have the chance. It won't last long.






================================================================
Good Netiquette to all!
================================================================

For a great email parody, view the following link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTgYHHKs0Zw&__scoop_post=bcaa0440-2548-11e5-c1bd-90b11c3d2b20&__scoop_topic=2455618



==============================================
**Important note** - contact our company for very powerful solutions for IP management (IPv4 and IPv6, security, firewall and APT solutions:

www.tabularosa.net

In addition to this blog, Netiquette IQ has a website with great assets which are being added to on a regular basis. I have authored the premiere book on Netiquette, “Netiquette IQ - A Comprehensive Guide to Improve, Enhance and Add Power to Your Email". My new book, “You’re Hired! Super Charge Your Email Skills in 60 Minutes. . . And Get That Job!” will be published soon follow by a trilogy of books on Netiquette for young people. You can view my profile, reviews of the book and content excerpts at:

 www.amazon.com/author/paulbabicki

 If you would like to listen to experts in all aspects of Netiquette and communication, try my radio show on BlogtalkRadio  Additionally, I provide content for an online newsletter via paper.li. I have also established Netiquette discussion groups with Linkedin and Yahoo.  I am also a member of the International Business Etiquette and Protocol Group and Minding Manners among others. Further, I regularly consult for the Gerson Lehrman Group, a worldwide network of subject matter experts and have been a contributor to numerous blogs and publications. 

Lastly, I am the founder and president of Tabula Rosa Systems, a company that provides “best of breed” products for network, security and system management and services. Tabula Rosa has a new blog and Twitter site which offers great IT product information for virtually anyone.
==============================================
  video

No comments:

Post a Comment